The Judgmental Sampling is the use of professional opinion and experience to select specimen collection locations.

In the context of the environment, "judgmental sampling" refers to a method of selecting a sample of data or observations based on the judgment or expertise of the person collecting the sample. Judgmental sampling is often used when the population of interest is difficult to define or when the resources are not available to collect a random sample.

In judgmental sampling, the person collecting the sample uses their knowledge and experience to select a sample that is representative of the population of interest. For example, a researcher might use judgmental sampling to select a sample of water samples from a lake in order to assess the water quality. The researcher might use their knowledge of the lake and its characteristics to select a sample that is representative of the lake as a whole.

Here are a few examples of how "judgmental sampling" might be used in the context of the environment:

  • Environmental monitoring: Judgmental sampling might be used in an environmental monitoring program to select a sample of data or observations that is representative of the environment being monitored. For example, a researcher might use judgmental sampling to select a sample of water samples from a lake in order to assess the water quality

  • Risk assessment: Judgmental sampling might be used in a risk assessment to select a sample of data or observations that is representative of the potential risks being evaluated. For example, a researcher might use judgmental sampling to select a sample of soil samples from an industrial site in order to assess the potential risks to human health or the environment.

  • Environmental research: Judgmental sampling might be used in environmental research to select a sample of data or observations that is representative of the population of interest. For example, a researcher might use judgmental sampling to select a sample of plant specimens from a forest in order to study the diversity of plant species in the forest.

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